Travel Briefings

Freely Travel Briefing: Issue No.19

If you’ve got a crumbling World Health Organisation booklet lying around somewhere that proves you’ve had your yellow fever jab, you’re probably delighted to learn we’re going digital. But no matter your opinion on vaccine passports, we’re all going to need one to travel – so this week, we’ll learn how they function overseas and how to COVID-proof our travel plans. Australian migrants will also share their biggest culture shocks, and we’ll turn our ears to lullabies around the world to see how they reflect major global issues. Have a wonderful weekend, Freelies – and send us your best ‘Woke up Like This’ snaps! 🏕️

Vaccine Passports Around the Globe

Photo by: Mayur
Until all countries agree on a universal vaccine passport, there’ll be a plethora of different systems we travellers will have to navigate.

Already, many of our favourite holiday destinations require visitors to have been fully vaccinated, from Malta to Thailand. Others insist you prove your vax status before you step foot in an art gallery or sit down to munch on your morning croissant. Until all countries agree on a universal vaccine passport, there’ll be a plethora of different systems we travellers will have to navigate, but one thing is for sure: we’re going to need proof of vaccination if we want to have proper fun overseas again.

Full piece by: Michael Gebicki in Traveller

How to COVID-Proof Your Travel Plans

Photo by: Andrei Miranchuk
We can use maths to make better decisions in the face of uncertainty

Here at Freely, we’ve always got travel on the brain, and no amount of restrictions can stop us dreaming of our next grand adventure. We’ll admit, though, that making holiday plans is precarious at best in the current climate. Not only are there ways to mitigate the risks, however (such as checking your travel insurance for COVID-19 protection) – we can also use maths to make better decisions in the face of uncertainty. In this article, a collection of experts share their tips for COVID-proofing your holiday plans.


Full piece by: Justine Landis-Hanley in The Guardian

Living Lullabies: An Audio-Visual Spectacular

Photo by: Barbara Verge

Bedtime songs across cultures all have one thing in common.

The first known lullaby was discovered on the border of Syria and Turkey, etched onto an ancient tablet. Bedtime songs across cultures all have one thing in common: though the melody and act of being rocked to sleep are for the child, the lyrics are for the parents, so they often impart a cautionary message or prayer. In this extraordinary project, Nat Geo photographer Hannah Reyes Morales met with caregivers living in polluted cities, as refugees displaced from their homes and on tiny fishing boats to explore critical issues facing women and children through their night-time rituals.

Explore the Chapters on Living Lullabies or read in National Geographic

Australian Migrants Share Their Biggest Culture Shocks

Photo by: Tom Rumble
Moving to the Land Down Under came with a set of expectations, but there were a bunch of things to navigate that they couldn’t have predicted.

If you’ve lived or even travelled overseas, you’ll be aware of the culture shock that can arise from feeling out of place in an unfamiliar environment. For these six migrants, moving to the Land Down Under came with a set of expectations: there’ll be spiders, lots of slang and hot, sweaty summers. But there were also a bunch of things to navigate that they couldn’t have predicted (apparently we’re in denial about the weather!) – and this is some of what shocked them the most.

Full piece: By Wing Kuang and Prianka Srinivasan for the ABC

AROUND THE WORLD

Thanks to years of campaigning by the Butchulla people, the world’s largest sand island has quite literally been returned to paradise with the restoration of its original name, K’Gari (pronounced “Gurri” and meaning "paradise"). Its former name, Fraser Island, was a tribute to Eliza Fraser: a woman shipwrecked there in 1836 who later wove a wildly damaging story about her experience (famously painted by Sidney Nolan) that led to the massacre and dispossession of the Traditional Owners. Environment Minister Steven Miles stressed that though the name change was immediate, it’s only for the national park, but the Butchulla people are determined it will one day refer to the island in its entirety.🤞🏽
Miami International Airport has become the first in the world to enlist our furry friends in the fight against coronavirus. When it comes to detecting COVID, sniffer dogs Cobra and One Betta have an accuracy rate of 99.4% and 98.1% respectively. Although they’re only being tested on employees at the moment, travellers will soon come under their noses too (though the method is purely voluntary, and anyone with a dog phobia, religious reason or health concern can opt out).
The Northern Territory has launched a new campaign to lure vaxxed tourists during the wet season. Visitors who’ve been double-jabbed will be able to access a $200 discount for every $1000 spent on travel expenses up to $5000. This makes the NT the first Australian jurisdiction to incentivise travel for those who’ve been vaccinated, but we’re keen for others to follow if it means mad discounts are up for grabs! 🐊.

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